immediate effects

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Mr Kratz wrote an excellent Blog on how to handle Projects in Outlook, which works for all versions up 'til 2003.

Anyone who have used Outlook 2003 and switched to 2007 wonders what has changed and why you can’t work like you did before. In this blog, we will show how to make it work with a tweak also in Outlook 2007.

In Outlook 2003 you have a Field for Contact in the Task (lower left corner). This has been removed in the Outlook 2007 Task template what causes a problem for you if you want to implement Project-Management in Outlook as Mr Kratz explains in his Blog. However, there is a way to circumvent this problem:

Open Extras in the main Menu | Forms | Create a Form and choose the form “Task”. You now see the form in design mode and also some additional Tabs with names like S1 and S2 on top. Click on tab S1 and add a new field. The choice of fields opens automatically. Choose “Contact” and position it somewhere on the top.

Choose “Publish” in the Menu and click “Publish in” and choose the “Library for Personal Forms”. Give it a new name, like “MyTask”. Exit and go to Tasks in Outlook and choose “Properties”. At the bottom you’ll see a field with a drop-down choice of Forms. Look for “MyTask” and exit.

Now you can use Mr Kratz’s method of managing your projects in Outlook 2007 as you’re used to. The only difference is that Contact is now displayed in the ribbon on top of your Tasks. Thus you can continue to add Tasks to an existing Project through adding the Project name in the Contact field.

The way I display my tasks in Categories, is by adding a column for Contact so I can see what Tasks are linked to what Projects.

I hope this works for you and good GTDing!

Göran Askeljung

GTD Expert and Trainer.

http://www.immediate-effects.com

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